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North Carolina COVID-19 latest news updates


Here you can find up-to-the-minute information on the coronavirus in the Piedmont Triad, North Carolina and the surrounding region. Click the video player above for the latest information from North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper.Live Updates:10:55 p.m. Wednesday: A man from Davie County is out of the hospital and back home Wednesday night weeks after being diagnosed with COVID-19 and being on a ventilator for more than a month. Jim Spry said his message for others battling COVID-19 is to keep praying and to never give up.“It’s a miracle. The doctor at the hospital told me I won the lottery,” Spry said.He is back at home with his family and wife of 50 years after spending eight weeks in the hospital battling COVID-19.Click the link below to read more.6:20 p.m. Wednesday: Two Wake Forest Baptist Health emergency medicine physicians were invited by the NFL to attend the Super Bowl.Dr. Jennifer Hannum and Dr. Manoh Pariyadath are among the 7,500 health care workers who have been vaccinated that will be at the game for free as the NFL honors those who have been on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.3:45 p.m. Wednesday: The Davidson County Transportation System will provide free rides to all residents going to vaccination clinics for free.Residents should have their vaccination appointment already scheduled before scheduling a ride, which should be done 24 to 48 hours in advance by calling 336-242-2250.2:55 p.m. Wednesday: The Rockingham County WRECC PreK school will be closed until Feb. 15 because of a coronavirus outbreak among staff and students.The school said those attending the “BB-Thursday/Friday” schedule were affecting and those who were directly exposed have been notified.Students will learn remotely until the school reopens. 2:50 p.m. Wednesday: The proceeds from the first-ever Virtual Mistletoe Run will go to help students and families during the coronavirus pandemic in the Triad.Organizers said 897 runners raised $35,000 for the YMCA’s E-learning Academies.“Funds for these academies will not only help students excel academically when they’re out of their school building due to the ongoing pandemic, but it helps students develop their social and emotional skills, too,” said Kim McClure, Vice President of Youth Development, Sports and Aquatics for the YMCA of Northwest North Carolina.“We cannot thank our runners and event sponsors enough for your continued support of the Y and the communities we serve. You’ve made this possible for the 37th year — even in a year of so much uncertainty and change,” said Stan Law, President and CEO of the YMCA of Northwest North Carolina.2:45 p.m. Wednesday: Novant Health announced three Novant Health Express at Walgreens will open in North Carolina, with one of them opening in Winston-Salem.The healthcare company said it will open at the location on 1712 S. Stratford Road in Winston-Salem.At this time, COVID-19 vaccinations will not be offered at this site.“Novant Health is excited to partner with Walgreens as this will help us make healthcare more convenient, affordable and accessible,” said Dr. Pam Oliver, executive vice president and president of Novant Health Physician Network. “Our new clinics at Walgreens create an additional venue for Novant Health to support and care for community members with chronic conditions as well as expand access to quality care for minor illnesses and injuries.”2:40 p.m. Wednesday: NCDHHS reported that the coronavirus data for Wednesday included a large number of delayed cases from tests performed at FastMed Urgent Care clinics in December and January added to the day’s data.The state reported 169 deaths Wednesday, which is the highest death toll reported in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic.9:45 p.m. Tuesday: Walgreens announces plan to administer COVID-19 vaccines at 300 locations in North Carolina, thanks to a federal program.The CDC will allot more than 31,000 doses across the state. Vaccinations will begin Feb. 12.2:30 p.m. Tuesday: Gov. Roy Cooper and top state education leaders are urging on North Carolina’s K-12 school districts to allow in-person instruction for all students. Cooper joined North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Catherine Truitt and State Board of Education Chair Eric Davis to thank educators for their extraordinary work during an unprecedented time, to highlight ongoing research that shows that with proper mitigation measures, in-person learning is safe, and to emphasize the critical importance of ensuring all students have an opportunity to learn in a classroom. “Protecting the health and safety of the people of this state, especially our children and our teachers, has been our goal,” Cooper said. “We know school is important for reasons beyond academic instruction. School is where students learn social skills, get reliable meals, and find their voices. Research done right here in North Carolina tells us that in-person learning is working and that students can be in classrooms safely with the right safety protocols in place.” Since the beginning of the pandemic, state leaders have emphasized the importance of returning students to in-person learning as quickly and safely as possible. Children who rely solely on remote instruction are feeling the negative effects of isolation, including learning loss, mental health challenges and food insecurity. The state’s public health toolkit details specific health and safety protocols K-12 schools must implement to keep students and teachers safe during in-person instruction.“Even with the thousands of students and teachers attending school in-person across the state, we have seen few COVID-19 clusters in our public schools,” Cohen said. “Our Department will continue to serve our school communities, offering resources and support so we can keep our school doors open.” Increasing evidence suggests that, with prevention measures in place, there are low rates of COVID-19 transmission in primary and secondary school settings even with high rates of community transmission. In addition, ongoing medical studies and peer-reviewed data affirm that children infected with COVID-19 generally have mild or no symptoms, and are less likely to spread the disease. “Learning loss resulting from COVID has the potential to be a generational hurdle, but the data we have seen shows us that schools can reopen safely if they adhere to COVID prevention policies,” Truitt said. “For many schools, the logistics of returning to in-person instruction five days per week will be a challenge, but this is absolutely a challenge we must face head on so that all students have a chance to fulfill their potential. With strong prevention measures in place, and the scientific research to back them, now is the time to act. North Carolina’s students cannot lose any more time.” 1:30 p.m. Tuesday: Gov. Roy Cooper, his secretary of health and a bipartisan pair of the state’s top education officials will press school systems across North Carolina Tuesday afternoon to reopen for in-person learning, state Superintendent for Public Instruction Catherine Truitt said.Truitt said the call will come during a previously announced 2 p.m. coronavirus briefing and that she will join Cooper, Dr. Mandy Cohen and State Board of Education Chairman Eric Davis in “an effort to urge our districts across the state to reopen our schools to in-person learning.”12 p.m. Tuesday: Another 2,926 coronavirus cases were reported in North Carolina on Tuesday, the first day since Dec. 27 and one of only a few days since October that the state has been under the 3,000 mark. 4:20 p.m. Monday: North Carolina surpassed the 1 million mark of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered across the state on Friday. This milestone capped a week when the state’s vaccine providers administered more than 99% of first doses.Beginning Monday, the state’s dashboard will be updated every weekday so North Carolinians can track the state’s administration of COVID-19 vaccines. “I am so grateful to our vaccine partners across the state who continue working in innovative ways to make sure North Carolinians have a spot to take their shot. It is incumbent on all of us to use the limited supply of vaccine we have as quickly and equitably as possible, finding new ways to meet people where they are,” Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen said.For the next three weeks, the state is guaranteeing baseline vaccine allocations to providers. In addition, it will set aside doses of the state’s allocation to ensure equitable access to underserved and rural communities. Vaccine supply continues to be very low, and health officials urge that there may be wait times. North Carolinians can find out when they will be eligible to get their vaccine through the online tool, Find My Vaccine Group. The screener walks users through a series of questions to determine which vaccine group they are in. People can then sign up to be notified when their group can get vaccinated. North Carolina is currently vaccinating people in Groups 1 and 2, which include health care workers, long-term care staff and residents and people 65 and older.12 p.m. Monday: North Carolina reported just seven coronavirus-related deaths on Monday after topping 100 deaths a day for most of last week. The state also reported another 3,776 infections, which is the fewest since Dec. 29, and 2,781 people being treated for COVID-19 in hospitals statewide, the fewest since Dec. 14. 11 a.m. Monday: The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services will kick off a new live stream talk series to address and provide updates on the state’s COVID-19 vaccination plan at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2. NCDHHS Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen will host the inaugural fireside chat featuring Rev. Dr. William Barber II as its first guest. Spectacular Magazine Publisher and CEO Phyllis Coley will moderate and the event will stream live on the following: NCDHHS: Facebook and Twitter Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Repairers of the Breach: Facebook, Twitter and YouTubeThe fireside chats are part of the state’s ongoing public engagement to slow the spread of COVID-19 and ensure equitable access to timely information, resources and COVID-19 vaccines.Each talk will be hosted by a NCDHHS official and will feature health experts, community leaders and others who serve historically marginalized populations and rural communities. To access the inaugural fireside chat, click on one of the links provided above.Resources:

Here you can find up-to-the-minute information on the coronavirus in the Piedmont Triad, North Carolina and the surrounding region.

Click the video player above for the latest information from North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper.


Live Updates:

10:55 p.m. Wednesday: A man from Davie County is out of the hospital and back home Wednesday night weeks after being diagnosed with COVID-19 and being on a ventilator for more than a month.

Jim Spry said his message for others battling COVID-19 is to keep praying and to never give up.

“It’s a miracle. The doctor at the hospital told me I won the lottery,” Spry said.

He is back at home with his family and wife of 50 years after spending eight weeks in the hospital battling COVID-19.

Click the link below to read more.


6:20 p.m. Wednesday: Two Wake Forest Baptist Health emergency medicine physicians were invited by the NFL to attend the Super Bowl.

Dr. Jennifer Hannum and Dr. Manoh Pariyadath are among the 7,500 health care workers who have been vaccinated that will be at the game for free as the NFL honors those who have been on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

3:45 p.m. Wednesday: The Davidson County Transportation System will provide free rides to all residents going to vaccination clinics for free.

Residents should have their vaccination appointment already scheduled before scheduling a ride, which should be done 24 to 48 hours in advance by calling 336-242-2250.

2:55 p.m. Wednesday: The Rockingham County WRECC PreK school will be closed until Feb. 15 because of a coronavirus outbreak among staff and students.

The school said those attending the “BB-Thursday/Friday” schedule were affecting and those who were directly exposed have been notified.

Students will learn remotely until the school reopens.

2:50 p.m. Wednesday: The proceeds from the first-ever Virtual Mistletoe Run will go to help students and families during the coronavirus pandemic in the Triad.

Organizers said 897 runners raised $35,000 for the YMCA’s E-learning Academies.

“Funds for these academies will not only help students excel academically when they’re out of their school building due to the ongoing pandemic, but it helps students develop their social and emotional skills, too,” said Kim McClure, Vice President of Youth Development, Sports and Aquatics for the YMCA of Northwest North Carolina.

“We cannot thank our runners and event sponsors enough for your continued support of the Y and the communities we serve. You’ve made this possible for the 37th year — even in a year of so much uncertainty and change,” said Stan Law, President and CEO of the YMCA of Northwest North Carolina.

2:45 p.m. Wednesday: Novant Health announced three Novant Health Express at Walgreens will open in North Carolina, with one of them opening in Winston-Salem.

The healthcare company said it will open at the location on 1712 S. Stratford Road in Winston-Salem.

At this time, COVID-19 vaccinations will not be offered at this site.

“Novant Health is excited to partner with Walgreens as this will help us make healthcare more convenient, affordable and accessible,” said Dr. Pam Oliver, executive vice president and president of Novant Health Physician Network. “Our new clinics at Walgreens create an additional venue for Novant Health to support and care for community members with chronic conditions as well as expand access to quality care for minor illnesses and injuries.”

2:40 p.m. Wednesday: NCDHHS reported that the coronavirus data for Wednesday included a large number of delayed cases from tests performed at FastMed Urgent Care clinics in December and January added to the day’s data.

The state reported 169 deaths Wednesday, which is the highest death toll reported in a single day since the beginning of the pandemic.


9:45 p.m. Tuesday: Walgreens announces plan to administer COVID-19 vaccines at 300 locations in North Carolina, thanks to a federal program.

The CDC will allot more than 31,000 doses across the state. Vaccinations will begin Feb. 12.

2:30 p.m. Tuesday: Gov. Roy Cooper and top state education leaders are urging on North Carolina’s K-12 school districts to allow in-person instruction for all students.

Cooper joined North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Mandy Cohen, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Catherine Truitt and State Board of Education Chair Eric Davis to thank educators for their extraordinary work during an unprecedented time, to highlight ongoing research that shows that with proper mitigation measures, in-person learning is safe, and to emphasize the critical importance of ensuring all students have an opportunity to learn in a classroom.

“Protecting the health and safety of the people of this state, especially our children and our teachers, has been our goal,” Cooper said. “We know school is important for reasons beyond academic instruction. School is where students learn social skills, get reliable meals, and find their voices. Research done right here in North Carolina tells us that in-person learning is working and that students can be in classrooms safely with the right safety protocols in place.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic, state leaders have emphasized the importance of returning students to in-person learning as quickly and safely as possible. Children who rely solely on remote instruction are feeling the negative effects of isolation, including learning loss, mental health challenges and food insecurity.

The state’s public health toolkit details specific health and safety protocols K-12 schools must implement to keep students and teachers safe during in-person instruction.

“Even with the thousands of students and teachers attending school in-person across the state, we have seen few COVID-19 clusters in our public schools,” Cohen said. “Our Department will continue to serve our school communities, offering resources and support so we can keep our school doors open.”

Increasing evidence suggests that, with prevention measures in place, there are low rates of COVID-19 transmission in primary and secondary school settings even with high rates of community transmission.

In addition, ongoing medical studies and peer-reviewed data affirm that children infected with COVID-19 generally have mild or no symptoms, and are less likely to spread the disease.

“Learning loss resulting from COVID has the potential to be a generational hurdle, but the data we have seen shows us that schools can reopen safely if they adhere to COVID prevention policies,” Truitt said. “For many schools, the logistics of returning to in-person instruction five days per week will be a challenge, but this is absolutely a challenge we must face head on so that all students have a chance to fulfill their potential. With strong prevention measures in place, and the scientific research to back them, now is the time to act. North Carolina’s students cannot lose any more time.”

1:30 p.m. Tuesday: Gov. Roy Cooper, his secretary of health and a bipartisan pair of the state’s top education officials will press school systems across North Carolina Tuesday afternoon to reopen for in-person learning, state Superintendent for Public Instruction Catherine Truitt said.

Truitt said the call will come during a previously announced 2 p.m. coronavirus briefing and that she will join Cooper, Dr. Mandy Cohen and State Board of Education Chairman Eric Davis in “an effort to urge our districts across the state to reopen our schools to in-person learning.”

12 p.m. Tuesday: Another 2,926 coronavirus cases were reported in North Carolina on Tuesday, the first day since Dec. 27 and one of only a few days since October that the state has been under the 3,000 mark.

COVID-19

4:20 p.m. Monday: North Carolina surpassed the 1 million mark of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered across the state on Friday. This milestone capped a week when the state’s vaccine providers administered more than 99% of first doses.

Beginning Monday, the state’s dashboard will be updated every weekday so North Carolinians can track the state’s administration of COVID-19 vaccines.

“I am so grateful to our vaccine partners across the state who continue working in innovative ways to make sure North Carolinians have a spot to take their shot. It is incumbent on all of us to use the limited supply of vaccine we have as quickly and equitably as possible, finding new ways to meet people where they are,” Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen said.

For the next three weeks, the state is guaranteeing baseline vaccine allocations to providers. In addition, it will set aside doses of the state’s allocation to ensure equitable access to underserved and rural communities.

Vaccine supply continues to be very low, and health officials urge that there may be wait times.

North Carolinians can find out when they will be eligible to get their vaccine through the online tool, Find My Vaccine Group. The screener walks users through a series of questions to determine which vaccine group they are in. People can then sign up to be notified when their group can get vaccinated.

North Carolina is currently vaccinating people in Groups 1 and 2, which include health care workers, long-term care staff and residents and people 65 and older.

12 p.m. Monday: North Carolina reported just seven coronavirus-related deaths on Monday after topping 100 deaths a day for most of last week. The state also reported another 3,776 infections, which is the fewest since Dec. 29, and 2,781 people being treated for COVID-19 in hospitals statewide, the fewest since Dec. 14.

11 a.m. Monday: The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services will kick off a new live stream talk series to address and provide updates on the state’s COVID-19 vaccination plan at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2.

NCDHHS Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen will host the inaugural fireside chat featuring Rev. Dr. William Barber II as its first guest.

Spectacular Magazine Publisher and CEO Phyllis Coley will moderate and the event will stream live on the following:

The fireside chats are part of the state’s ongoing public engagement to slow the spread of COVID-19 and ensure equitable access to timely information, resources and COVID-19 vaccines.

Each talk will be hosted by a NCDHHS official and will feature health experts, community leaders and others who serve historically marginalized populations and rural communities.

To access the inaugural fireside chat, click on one of the links provided above.


Resources:



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