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COMMENTARY: Biden vs. Georgia — again | Opinion


Despite the authors’ claims the issue isn’t partisan, Georgia Democrats have been notably subdued in their public statements while Peach State Republicans have publicly urged Biden to intervene. It could reflect the bind the Biden administration finds itself in dealing with two large companies with major investments in the U.S. LG has a battery plant in Michigan, is close to completing a cell manufacturing plant in Ohio, and has pledged at least $4.5 billion in new investments in the U.S. by 2025.

As a result, Michigan and Ohio lawmakers are urging Biden to stay out of the ITC fight. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, for example, has been urging the ITC to act for months. Now that it has, he said in a letter to the Biden administration, “LG Chem’s stolen intellectual property should not be used to directly compete against Ohio workers at the new factory or the Ohio- and Michigan-based businesses in the factory’s supply chain.”

Neither Democratic Sens. Jon Ossoff’s or Raphael Warnock’s office replied to a request for comment. But Warnock has previously told the press he has spoken with the Biden administration and hopes a deal can be reached. “I am working to make sure Georgians will benefit from the jobs they were promised.”

But can Georgia compete politically with Midwestern states like Michigan where Democrats have tended to fare far better in elections? It’s true Biden carried Georgia and the state just elected two Democratic senators. It’s also true Republican Donald Trump carried Michigan in 2016.



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