in

Senate report suggests military housing company’s fraud continues


Senators from both parties asked Tuesday whether a top U.S. military housing contractor that pleaded guilty last year to defrauding the government should keep its job, amid signs the company may be continuing to allow military families to reside in shoddy, even dangerous homes.

The company, Balfour Beatty Communities LLC, pleaded guilty in federal district court in Washington in December to defrauding the armed forces by falsifying housing repair records from 2013 to 2019 in order to receive higher performance awards. The company paid $65 million in fines and restitution.

According to the plea agreement between Balfour Beatty and the Justice Department, the company doctored data in a work order database so as to appear to be promptly and effectively handling repair requests at military homes while, in reality, problems such as mold and rodents had continued to fester. Top executives were not convicted, though two lower-ranking company officials were.

A bipartisan report made public Tuesday by the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations suggests Balfour Beatty has been engaged since 2019 in similar and “ongoing mistreatment” of military families. The panel’s probe covered homes at Fort Gordon, an Army base in Georgia, and Sheppard Air Force Base in Texas. 

At a hearing of the subcommittee on Tuesday, senators heard stories from military personnel who lived at those bases and who were unable to get the company to remove what the residents said was dangerous mold in their homes. 



Source link

     

       “WE KNOW HOW TO FIGHT”

                                   

Thank you so much for supporting Jon Ossoff’s Senate campaign.

                                       

Thank you so much for supporting Joe Biden’s Presidential campaign.

What do you think?

Written by Politixia

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Kevin Bacon Reacts to His 1986 Ad Still Up in N.Y.C. Subway Station

Chicago Fire Department makes progress, but not enough, toward ending racial, sexual discrimination