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Georgia Primary: What’s on your ballot?


You probably know early voting is underway in Georgia and have likely heard the names Brian Kemp, David Perdue, Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker. That last name you probably knew long before he decided to run for U.S. Senate.

And while you may not have known who was Georgia’s secretary of state before December 2020, thanks to former President Donald Trump, you’re likely aware that Trump’s followers don’t want Brad Raffensperger to win re-election to what is traditionally a low-profile job.

When you go to vote either early, absentee or at your precinct on May 24, be prepared to see scores of other candidates on your primary ballot running for more than a dozen state and local offices. Especially if you’re a Republican.

Scroll down to read about everyone running for statewide offices and the U.S. House and state legislative seats representing Southeast Georgia. To see who’s on local ballots, go directly to voters guides for Camden, Glynn and Ware counties. A look at the local races in Brantley, Charlton, Clinch and Pierce county will be posted soon.

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MORE: When, where to vote early in the Georgia Primary


U.S. Senate

Six men are running to be the Republican candidate on the November General Election ballot. If no candidate gets more than 50% of the vote in the primary, the top two advance to a runoff scheduled for June 21.

  • Josh Clark – Born in Atlanta, Clark’s professional experience includes owning a nutraceutical distribution company and a real estate and management company. He was a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, representing District 98 from 2011 to 2015. (Campaign bio)
  • Kelvin King graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy and served as an officer. His professional experience included working in procurement, business development and construction. King also founded Osprey Management, a construction firm. (Campaign bio)
  • Jonathan McColumn received a BA from Georgia College in 1986 and master’s degrees from Elmira College (1992), Webster University (2002) and U.S. Army War College (2010). McColumn worked as a clergyman, a general officer in the U.S. Army and an instructor at Phoenix University. (Campign bio)
  • Latham Saddler graduated from the University of Georgia and has a master’s in International Affairs from Georgia Tech. He served as a U.S. Navy SEAL officer and was director of intelligence programs for the National Security Council. Saddler also worked as a White House Fellow from 2018 to 2019. (Campaign bio)
  • Herschel Walker attended the University of Georgia where he was an All-American in both football and track-and-field, leaving college after winning 1982 Heisman Trophy to play in the USFL and NFL. Since leaving sports, he has worked for a number of food-supply businesses. Former President Donald Trump appointed Walker as chair of the Council on Sports, Fitness, and Nutrition in 2018. (Campaign bio)

Georgia governor

Five candidates are running to be the Republican candidate on the November General Election ballot. If no candidate gets more than 50% of the vote in the primary, the top two advance to a runoff scheduled for June 21.

  • Brian Kemp is running for re-election as governor of Georgia. Kemp defeated former state Rep. Stacey Abrams (D) in the 2018 election by just over 1 percentage point, succeeding term-limited Gov. Nathan Deal (R). Kemp first won elected office in 2012, when he unseated state Sen. Doug Haines (D). In 2006, Kemp ran for agriculture commissioner but was defeated in the Republican primary. Four years later, then-Gov. Sonny Perdue (R) appointed Kemp to the Georgia Secretary of State office vacated by Karen Handel (R), who had resigned to run for governor. He was re-elected to that post twice. Before entering elected office, Kemp was a small business owner, managing Athens-based Kemp Properties. (Campaign bio)
  • David Perdue was a member of the U.S. Senate from Georgia from January 2015, replacing retiring incumbent Saxby Chambliss (R). Perdue was defeated by Democrat Jon Ossoff in January 2021. Prior to running for Senate, Perdue served as CEO of Reebok, Dollar General and Pillowtex. (Campaign website)
  • Kandiss Taylor was born in Baxley, Georgia. She received a bachelor’s degree in 2003, a master’s degree in 2005 and a specialist’s degree in 2006 from Georgia Southern University. She also received a Ph.D. from Regent University in 2014. Taylor’s professional experience includes working as a student services coordinator and she is certified in early childhood teaching and in school counseling. (Campaign website)
  • Tom Williams – Little information is available about Williams. One news site described him as a civil service retiree. We could not find a campaign website or social media account for Williams.

Even though there’s only one candidate for governor on the Democratic side, her name will appear on the ballot.

  • Stacey Abrams graduated from Avondale High School and has earned degrees from Spelman College, the University of Texas, and Yale University Law School. Shas owned a business and worked as a partner in Insomnia LLC; the CEO of Sage Works LLC; was deputy city attorney for the city of Atlanta; special counsel to Sutherland, Asbill and Brennan; and a teacher at Spelman College and Yale University. She was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives, District 89 in 2006 and served as House minority leader from 2011 to 2017. Abrams resigned her state House seat in August 2017 to run for governor in 2018, losing to Republican Brian Kemp but just over 1 percentage point. She founded and continues to lead the New Georgia Project, a voter registration group. (Campaign bio)

Lieutenant governor

Republican Geoff Duncan is not seeking re-election as Georgia’s lieutenant governor. Four Republicans and nine Democrats qualified to run for the office in 2022. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote in the party primary, the two receiving the most votes will meet in a runoff scheduled for June 21. The winners will face Libertarian Ryan Grahame in November.

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Secretary of State

Three Republican challengers and five Democrats will try to unseat incumbent Brad Raffensperger. If no candidate exceeds 50% of the vote in either party primary, the two with the most votes will face either other in a runoff on June 21.


Attorney general


Commissioner of agriculture


Commissioner of insurance


State school superintendent


Commissioner of labor


Public Service Commission, District 3


Public Service Commission, District 2

  • Tim Echols – incumbent public service commissioner from Hoschton, Georgia (Campaign website)

Georgia’s 1st Congressional District

One of Georgia’s 14 seats in the U.S. House represents Brantley, Camden, Charlton, Glynn, Pierce and Ware counties.

  • Earl “Buddy” Carter – A pharmacist who has held this seat in Congress since 2015. Prior to election to this seat, Carter was mayor of Pooler, Georgia, served in the Georgia House and Senate. He lives in Savannah with a wife and four children. (Campaign website)

Georgia’s 8th Congressional District

This South Central Georgia U.S. House seat includes Clinch County.

  • Austin Scott – Member of Congress from Tifton, Georgia. Before his election in 2011 he is agent and owner with The Southern Group and was senior agent with The Principal Financial Group. He has a BBA in risk management and insurance from the University of Georgia. (Campaign website)
  • Darrius Butler – Pastor in Warner Robins with degree from Carver College. He founded a non-profit and has served as the chair of the Boys & Girls Club. (Campaign website)

Georgia State Senate, District 3

Represents Brantley Camden, Charlton, Glynn and part of Ware counties. One-term Republican state Sen. Sheila McNeill is not seeking re-election. No Democratic candidates qualified to run for this office.

  • Mike Hodges – banker (No campaign website found)


Georgia State Senate, District 8

Includes Clinch, Pierce and part of Ware counties. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.

  • Russ Goodman – The incumbent, a Republican and a farmer from Homerville, drew no Republican or Democratic challengers. His name will appear on the ballot even though he is unopposed.


Georgia State House, District 167

Represents part of Glynn County. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.

  • Buddy DeLoach – The incumbent, a Republican who lives in Shellman Bluff and retired after a career in insurance, drew no Republican or Democratic challengers. His name will appear on the ballot even though he is unopposed.


Georgia State House, District 174

Includes Brantley, Charlton, Clinch and part of Ware County. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.

  • John Corbett – The incumbent, a Republican business owner and farmer who lives in Slake Park, drew no Republican or Democratic challengers. His name will appear on the ballot even though he is unopposed.


Georgia State House, District 176

Includes part of Ware County. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.

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  • James Burchett – The incumbent, a Republican who co-owns a law firm in Waycross, drew no Republican or Democratic challengers. His name will appear on the ballot even though he is unopposed.


Georgia State House, District 178

Includes Pierce County. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.


Georgia State House, District 179

Includes part of Glynn County. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.


Georgia State House, District 180

Includes part of Camden and Glynn counties. No Democrat qualified to run for this seat.


Candidate information was collected from the Georgia Secretary of State’s office, individual county elections offices and Ballotpedia.com.

Copyright 2022 by WJXT News4JAX – All rights reserved.



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