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Texas bar sues to punish AG Paxton for attempt to overturn election


The State Bar of Texas filed a lawsuit Wednesday to reprimand Attorney General Ken Paxton for his attempt to overturn 2020 election results in battleground states that former President Trump lost, AP reports.

Why it matters: The lawsuit comes a day after Trump-endorsed Paxton defeated George P. Bush for the Republican nomination for Texas attorney general, potentially setting him up for a third term at the post.

  • The lawsuit amounts to a formal accusation of professional misconduct against Paxton, making him one of the most prominent legal figures to face repercussions for helping Trump in his efforts to change the election results.

Paxton filed a lawsuit with the Supreme Court in December 2020 that sought to invalidate 10 million votes in Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania — battleground states that President Biden won.

  • The filing, which was supported 17 other states, specifically asked the court to extend the deadline for election certification to allow states to investigate allegations of widespread election fraud.
  • The court rejected the suit days later, though it was one of several attempts by the Trump campaign and the former president’s allies to overturn the election.

The big picture: The lawsuit filed by the Texas bar Wednesday asked a Dallas-area court to discipline Paxton for his lawsuit, calling it “dishonest,” according to AP.

Go deeper: Trump-endorsed Ken Paxton wins Texas GOP primary for attorney general



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