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New applicants for unemployment aid in the US fell from the previous week in a sign that the labour market remains tight.

There were 229,000 initial jobless claims on a seasonally adjusted basis in the week to June 11, according to the US labour department data released on Thursday. That was down from the previous week’s upwardly revised 232,000 claims, but surpassed the median forecast of 215,000 claims in a Reuters poll of economists.

Thursday’s report showed that the pace of new claims rose the most in California, Texas, New York, Illinois and Ohio, based on preliminary figures that were not seasonally adjusted.

“The latest data suggest that some sectors may be experiencing a modest uptick in lay-offs amid rising concerns over inflation, sentiment and the outlook,” said Mahir Rasheed, US economist at Oxford Economics.

The job market has remained hot, and the unemployment rate steadied to 3.6 per cent in May, which is close to its pre-pandemic level.

Technology groups, particularly in the cryptocurrency sector, have reported some dismissals recently.

Continuing jobless claims, which measure the number of Americans actively receiving unemployment aid, were 1.31mn in the week to June 4, an increase of 3,000 claims from the previous week.

Initial claims have increased in recent weeks but continuing claims have remained near their lowest level in more than 50 years.



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