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NH Republican congressional candidates look to build war chests


Republican New Hampshire congressional candidates are busy this week, not on the campaign trail, but working behind the scenes to make sure their campaigns have the resources necessary to win.Republicans said they hope that in the 2022 midterm elections, they will not only remove the gavel from Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s hand but also loosen her grip on House Democratic leadership once and for all.Last week in Concord, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel emphasized the importance of New Hampshire’s congressional races in achieving that GOP goal.”I really want to be the RNC chair that retires Nancy Pelosi,” she said. “So, if we do it, I’m going to get, like, a fun tattoo somewhere.”The ink that Republican congressional candidates want the most involves signatures on campaign donation checks. Candidate Karoline Leavitt’s bid to unseat two-Democratic U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas in the toss-up 1st District is expected to be a top priority.In Leavitt’s primary election, House Republican leadership endorsed one of her opponents, but she said that rift is in the rearview mirror.”We are a unified Republican Party,” she said. “I am humbled by the outpouring of support from Republicans both in New Hampshire and in Washington, D.C.”In the 2nd District, Republican Robert Burns is also building up his campaign war chest, working to earn a level of national support prior nominees haven’t been able to get.”Right now, we’re in D.C.,” Burns said. “I’ve had some great meetings with the (National Republican Congressional Committee), and I’ve got more meetings with them today. They’ve asked me to come back. So, I think we’re actually going to get quite a bit of help.”It’s been 12 years now since Republicans won both congressional seats in one election. While Leavitt and Burns and the GOP establishment may have kept a mutual distance in the primary, Washington insiders said the common goal of winning a majority and once again going two-for-two in New Hampshire is smoothing out any differences.”Republicans are lining up behind these candidates,” said Rick Klein, ABC News political director. “We’ve seen, I think, to my mind, remarkable party unity in embracing candidates, even though some of them have been pretty far outside the mainstream of the party.”

Republican New Hampshire congressional candidates are busy this week, not on the campaign trail, but working behind the scenes to make sure their campaigns have the resources necessary to win.

Republicans said they hope that in the 2022 midterm elections, they will not only remove the gavel from Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s hand but also loosen her grip on House Democratic leadership once and for all.

Last week in Concord, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel emphasized the importance of New Hampshire’s congressional races in achieving that GOP goal.

“I really want to be the RNC chair that retires Nancy Pelosi,” she said. “So, if we do it, I’m going to get, like, a fun tattoo somewhere.”

The ink that Republican congressional candidates want the most involves signatures on campaign donation checks. Candidate Karoline Leavitt’s bid to unseat two-Democratic U.S. Rep. Chris Pappas in the toss-up 1st District is expected to be a top priority.

In Leavitt’s primary election, House Republican leadership endorsed one of her opponents, but she said that rift is in the rearview mirror.

“We are a unified Republican Party,” she said. “I am humbled by the outpouring of support from Republicans both in New Hampshire and in Washington, D.C.”

In the 2nd District, Republican Robert Burns is also building up his campaign war chest, working to earn a level of national support prior nominees haven’t been able to get.

“Right now, we’re in D.C.,” Burns said. “I’ve had some great meetings with the (National Republican Congressional Committee), and I’ve got more meetings with them today. They’ve asked me to come back. So, I think we’re actually going to get quite a bit of help.”

It’s been 12 years now since Republicans won both congressional seats in one election. While Leavitt and Burns and the GOP establishment may have kept a mutual distance in the primary, Washington insiders said the common goal of winning a majority and once again going two-for-two in New Hampshire is smoothing out any differences.

“Republicans are lining up behind these candidates,” said Rick Klein, ABC News political director. “We’ve seen, I think, to my mind, remarkable party unity in embracing candidates, even though some of them have been pretty far outside the mainstream of the party.”



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