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Microsoft, Google-Backed Group Wants To Boost AI Education in Low-Income Schools

Microsoft, Google-Backed Group Wants To Boost AI Education in Low-Income Schools
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The AI Education Project has developed curriculum to help teachers and students understand artificial intelligence. From a report: With students taking advantage of ChatGPT for homework and term papers, there’s a lot of handwringing about whether artificial-intelligence tools are appropriate for school. Alex Kotran said his group wants to make sure those tools are used even more. Kotran is the chief executive officer of the AI Education Project (aiEDU), a nonprofit backed by companies such as Microsoft, Alphabet’s Google, OpenAI and AT&T, that provides free materials and teacher training to boost AI understanding in school districts. The idea is to teach kids about the technology, its limits and promise, and prepare them jobs where they’ll need to use AI.

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The group on Tuesday is announcing a national call for AI education with an expanded list of backers and partner schools at the South by Southwest EDU conference in Austin, Texas. So far, aiEDU has reached 100,000 students and has relationship with districts representing 1.5 million low-income and underserved kids across the country. The non-profit was founded in 2019, and Kotran thought it would take a few years before there was widespread demand from educators for these kinds of programs. “We were kind of wearing the T-shirt before the band was cool,” he said. Instead the rapid increase in interest in generative AI with the popularity of programs like OpenAI’s chatbot and Dall-E, its tool for digital images, has dramatically boosted demand, and the group could use more funding, he said.

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